Miami-Dade County Public Schools to begin school year online only and later Aug. 31 date

Miami-Dade County Public Schools will start the school year remotely — and late — on Aug. 31, school officials announced Wednesday.

Students, parents and teachers have been anticipating what some would say was an inevitable decision by school officials. With less than a month to go and an infection rate in Miami-Dade County more three times higher than the school district’s goal of 5%, reopening schools by the original Aug. 24 date was deemed impossible.

The announcement came during a special School Board meeting.

“We are ever cognizant that many families have already begun planning for a return to schooling through their preferred model for Stage II,” said Miami-Dade Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho. “However, in light of the viral surge in our community, we believe it is in the best interest of our students and employees to delay the return to the schoolhouse and commence the 2020-2021 school year from

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Back to school? Despite CDC recommendations, most major schools going online as COVID-19 cases spike

As COVID-19 cases rise in most states, the prospect of in-person learning this fall at the country’s major school districts is becoming increasingly remote.

So far, nine of the top 15 school systems by enrollment plan to start the fall semester online, with two more currently planning a hybrid of in-person and online classes, according to Education Week magazine’s reopening tracker. Other top districts shifted school schedules later, hoping for cases to decline or for teachers and administrators to have more time to plan for the school year. 

As back-to-school season approaches, it’s highly likely the majority of big districts will start learning remotely while they work out plans for socially distant reopenings, said Annette Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools.

The biggest factor: whether the community where the school is located is seeing infection rates decrease, said Kristi Wilson, superintendent of the

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